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    Sea Bream/ Gilt-head
     
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    Sea Bream/ Gilt-head

    The Sparidae is a family of fish, included in the order Perciformes. The fish of the family are commonly called Sea Breams and porgies (North America). The sheepshead, scup, and red sea bream are species in this family. They are found in shallow temperate and tropical waters and are bottom-dwelling carnivores. Most species possess grinding, molar-like teeth. Some of the species, such as Polysteganus undulosus, have been subject to overfishing, or exploitation beyond sustainable recovery.
    Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilt-head_bream

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    European Sea Bass/ Labrax
     
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    European Sea Bass/ Labrax

    The European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, also known as Morone labrax, is a primarily ocean-going fish that sometimes enters brackish and fresh waters. It is also known as the sea dace. Highly regarded as a food fish, it is often marketed as Mediterranean seabass, bronzini or branzini (branzino is the name of the fish in Northern Italy; in other parts of Italy, it is called spigola or ragno). In Spain, where, due to its popularity, it is farmed, it is called lubina or róbalo.
    Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_seabass

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    Barramundi/ Asian Seabass
     
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    Barramundi/ Asian Seabass

    The Barramundi (Lates calcarifer), also known as Asian Seabass, is a species of catadromous fish in family Latidae of order Perciformes. The native species is widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific region from the Persian Gulf, through Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea and Northern Australia. Known in Thai language as Pla Krapong (Thai: ปลากระพง), it is very popular in Thai cuisine. It is known as pandugappa in the Telugu language in India and bhetki in Bengali language and in Eastern India.
    Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barramundi

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    Tilapia
     
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    Tilapia

    Tilapia (pronounced /tɨˈlɑːpiə/ ti-LAH-pee-ə) is the common name for nearly a hundred species of cichlid fish from the tilapiine cichlid tribe. Tilapia inhabit a variety of fresh water habitats including shallow streams, ponds, rivers and lakes. Historically they have been of major importance in artisan fishing in Africa and the Levant and are of increasing importance in aquaculture . Tilapia can become problematic invasive species in new warm-water habitats, whether deliberately or accidentally introduced but generally not in temperate climates due to their inability to survive in cool waters, generally below 60 °F (16 °C).
    Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilapia

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    Cobia/ Black Salmon
     
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    Cobia/ Black Salmon

    Attaining a maximum length of 2 metres (78 inches) and maximum weight of 68 kilograms (150 pounds), cobia have elongate fusiform (spindle shaped) bodies and broad, flattened heads. Their eyes are small and their lower jaw projects slightly past the upper jaw. On the jaws, tongue and roof of the mouth are bands of villiform (fibrous) teeth. Their bodies are smooth with small scales, their dark brown coloration grading to white on the belly with two darker brown horizontal bands on the flanks. These may not be prominent except during spawning when cobia lighten in colour and adopt a more prominently striped pattern. The large pectoral fins are normally carried horizontally (rather than vertically as shown for convenience in the illustration), so that, as seen in the water they may be mistaken for a small shark. When boated, the horizontal pectoral fins enable the cobia to remain upright so that their vigorous thrashing can make them a hazard. The first dorsal fin is composed of six to nine independent, short, stout, and sharp spines. The family name Rachycentridae, from the Greek words rhachis meaning "spine" and kentron meaning "sting," is an allusion to these dorsal spines. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobia